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October 7th, 2016 by


With a growing number of road accidents each year, it’s clear not all commuters are taking their road safety as seriously as they should. 

Unfortunately, there are some who do but still fall into the crossfire of other negligible drivers. One of the golden rules of driving is to make responsible choices. Ego does not belong on the road and is often the root cause of accidents.

An important lesson to remember is to “drive like everyone around you does not know how to drive”.  This can prove useful in times when you ‘think’ a driver is going to act in a certain way and then doesn’t.

Here Are Six Road Safety Tips To Always Remember

Accident Chacklist

1. Keep Your Distance

Tailgating or driving far too close to the car in front of you is commonly seen on the roads. This is usually to speed the other car up but can be extremely dangerous should the car in front have to suddenly brake. 

The suggested driving distance between you and another car should remain around 20 metres, or the length of two cars. This will prevent any likelihood of  a possible accident or at least give you some time to break if the car in front should come into some trouble. 

2. It’s Simple: Don’t Drink and Drive

The intoxicating effects of alcohol include memory loss, loss of focus, impaired motor skills and a potential blackout. Getting behind the wheel is never a good idea once you are over the limit. 

A total of 4500 people died on South African roads last year with a large percentage as a result of drunk driving. Statistically-speaking, 58% of deaths worldwide, per year, can be attributed to alcohol consumption.

See the video below entitled,”PubLooShocker”. This anti-drunk driving campaign is really turning heads. 

3. No Texting While Driving

When your focus is not 100% on the road, accidents can definitely happen. Don’t prevent yourself from reacting to traffic, put down that phone. It can wait – your safety can’t. 

Did you know over 25% of all accidents are caused by someone on the phone?

Remember, risk takers are collision makers!

4. Suit Up, Dress Up, and, Whatever You Do, Belt Up

Your seatbelt is designed to protect you in a dangerous situation where you could be thrown from a car and potentially lose your life. Why wouldn’t you strap yourself in knowing this?

Over 53% of kids involved in car accidents are injured because they were not wearing a seatbelt. You can also be fined a minimum of R100 for not putting on your seatbelt. This amount can increase depending on where you driving.

Children under the age of 12 should be in the back seat, buckled up. Either in a booster seat or using the car seatbelt, depending on the age and weight of the child.

Babies between 0 months and one year of age, or up to 10kg in weight, should travel in a rear-facing car seat in the back of a car. This is vital as, in the event of an accident, all impact will occur on the car seat and not the baby.

5. Follow the Speed Limit

The speed limit is not something that is simply thought up out of thin air. It is a tried and tested measure to ensure, not only your safety, but everyone’s on the road.

These are the speed limits, according to the law, in certain areas:

  • Urban roads: 60km/h
  • Outside urban roads: 100km/h
  • Highways: 120km/h

You could be arrested on the spot for driving above the speed limit.

6. Make Sure You Are Accurately Covered

Car insurance is a vital part of being a car owner and can be a blessing in a crisis. Make sure you are accurately covered should anything happen and you are left with astronomical repair costs that you can’t possibly afford. 

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Remember, it costs nothing to have a sense of road safety when out in the world. Have respect for others’ safety as well as your own!

 

  • Terry Burrows

    Following distance should be 2 seconds. This then adjusts the distance according to speed. The faster you go the greater the distance. As the vehicle in front passes a marker on the road, count one hundred and one, one hundred and two. You should pass the same marker only after you finish the count, otherwise you are too close.