How To Identify The New (Safer) Galaxy Note 7

We follow up on the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 debacle & provide guidance on what to do if you have one & how to recognise the new (safe) version.
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Published: Tuesday, September 20th 2016
General
Samsung hasn't been having a good time of late thanks to the Galaxy Note 7. After a successful launch and rave reviews, the company has been forced to recall their latest flagship. This after reports that the device was exploding due to faulty battery issues.

What Samsung Has to Say About It

Samsung has officially recalled the device and will be issuing replacement handsets to Note 7 owners. The company issued a press release stating :
“Our number one priority is the safety of our customers. We are asking users to power down their Galaxy Note 7s and exchange them as soon as possible,” says DJ Koh, President of Mobile Communications Business, Samsung Electronics. “Samsung are expediting replacement devices so that they can be provided through the exchange program as conveniently as possible and in compliance with related regulations. We sincerely thank our customers for their understanding and patience."
Although there have been only a small number of reported incidents, Samsung is taking great care to provide customers with necessary support. Samsung has identified the affected inventory and stopped sales and shipments of those devices. They are also collaborating with national regulatory bodies. mobiledeals_article_banner

If You're An Owner of a Galaxy Note 7

Customers who have Galaxy Note 7 devices can replace their current device with a new device based on local availability. We encourage Galaxy Note 7 customers to contact their place of purchase or call their designated local call centre as soon as possible.
“Samsung cares for its loyal and supportive customers first and foremost. Our customers are very important to us and their safety is a key concern for Samsung. There is, after all, more to our relationship with consumers than simply sales and financial gain,” says Craige Fleischer, Director of Integrated Mobility at Samsung Electronics South Africa. As the Galaxy Note 7 had not been officially launched in the South African market at the time the battery cell challenges were identified, we took the decision not to release the handset into the South African market until these challenges are overcome. As such, the Galaxy Note 7 will be available in South Africa in November,” says Fleischer.

The New Note 7

If, however, you do own a Note 7 and have received, or will be receiving, a replacement Note7, here is how you can identify that it is indeed a new, safe device: Samsung has introduced a Green battery icon on the new Note 7. The icon has been included in three specific software changes. The new green battery icon will be visible on: 1) the Status Bar; 2) the Always On Display screen; and 3) the Power Off prompt screen, which can be accessed by long-pressing the power key. galaxynote7_exchange_battery_main_2_final Additionally, users can easily check if they are using the new Galaxy Note 7 by looking for a square symbol on the label of the packaging box as below. galaxynote7_exchange_battery_main_3_f Samsung has also created a website which allows you to check the IMEI number of your Note 7 to find out whether or not it is one of the faulty devices.
“As the Galaxy Note 7 had not been officially launched in the South African market at the time the battery cell challenges were identified, we took the decision not to release the handset into the South African market until these challenges are overcome. As such, the Galaxy Note 7 will be available in South Africa in November,” says Fleischer.
These are welcome measures, but will do little to ease the minds of concerned customers and airlines across the globe. Some airlines have even taken to banning the Note 7 from being used, switched on or charged on any of their flights. If you do own a Samsung Galaxy Note 7, you are urged to not switch the device on and return it for replacement as soon as possible.